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CM599: (New) Media Literacy Education: (Mobile) Foundations

 

INSTRUCTOR:

Prof. Rob Williams , Ph.D.

Email: williamsr@sacredheart.edu

 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Š   M.T. Anderson’s Feed. (Boston: Candlewick Press, 2002).

Š   Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains. (NY: W.W. Norton, 2010).

Š   David Croteau/Williams Hoynes/Stefania Milan: Media/Society – Industries, Images, and Audiences, Fourth Edition. (London: Sage, 2011).

Š   Clay Shirky’s Cognitive Surplus: How Technology Makes Consumers Into Collaborators. (NY: Penguin Books, 2010).

 

COURSE FOCUS:

As we enter the 21st century, new media literacy education is emerging as a fundamental approach underpinning so much of our educational and civic work.  This new SHU graduate program is specially designed to immerse our students in the ever-evolving world of new media literacy education, emphasizing the acquisition of knowledge and skills vital to individual and collective success in classrooms and communities.

 

Š   We can define new media literacy education for the 21st century with four action verbs.

o   We want our students to be able to access, analyze, evaluate and produce multimedia.

Š   We can define new media literacy education for the 21st century with three overlapping concepts.

o   We want our students to deepen their level of media skills, knowledge, and activism.

Š   We can define new media literacy education for the 21st century with a two-word idea.

o   We want our students to understand the idea of trade offs inherent in any media experience.

Š   We can define new media literacy education for the 21st century with a single key life skill.

o   We want our graduates to practice skepticism.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Students will increase their awareness and understanding of basic concepts and techniques of new media literacy education, as well as gaining a basic foundational knowledge of the sociopolitical, cultural and economic forces that drive 21st century media industries.

 

2. Students will examine 21st century media environments, including portrayal of “news” and entertainment content, and issues of “representation:” gender, race, class, violence, consumerism, alcohol, tobacco, etc.

 

4. Students will strengthen their own skills in critically analyzing news, documentary, fiction and other genres of print and image-based popular media texts, and explore how these critical media literacy education concepts can be taught in age-appropriate ways.

 

5. Students will gain specific “hands on” knowledge and practice about available resource materials for teaching the critical analysis of 21st century new/digital media.

 

6. Students will design their own classroom projects in which they bring new media literacy education knowledge and skills into play.